16 articles Article Audio

The Devastating Denver Flood of 1864

On May 19, 1864 – Cherry Creek did the unthinkable, it flooded, boy howdy how it flooded, causing distruction to the city of Denver on a grand scale. At the time, Colorado was experiencing an abnormally wet spring and it had rained unceasingly for days. At one point storms produced hail as “large as hen’s…

“Spanish” Influenza Hits Colorado Hard

Imagine sitting at the breakfast table, having your morning coffee, reading the newspaper – and seeing headlines like these: “Mayor Issues Flu Proclamation”, “State Forced to Take Hand in Flu Epidemic”, “More Flu in the Rural Districts”, “Dont Be a Knocker But Help Rid City of the Flu”. Yikes! In 1918 and 1919, influenza and…

Who Needs a World’s Fair – We’ve Got the National Western Stock Show!

Each January – herders, ranchers, cattlemen, stockmen, cowboys and livestock enthusiasts from around the country converge in Denver for the annual National Western Stock Show.   It has been in operation for over 110 years, but it has not been without its trials and tribulations.  Hear what happened back in 1898 that created headlines for…

Colorado Puts on Its Big Boy Pants and Gets a Railroad

Given how we Coloradans all view Denver to be the center of the Rocky Mountain region, it is almost unthinkable that others would not see it that way and not want to hook Denver up in any way they could with the rest of the country. However – there were times when Denver almost missed…

Colorado’s 10th Mountain Division – in Their Own Words

The original 10th Mountain Division was formed in Nov. 1941 and was made up of skiers, forest rangers, lumberjacks, and other outfitters and guides. Training primarily at Camp Hale CO,  they were the last U.S. Army division committed to the European Theatre, and fought in northern Italy for over 110 days.  In 1945, while battling…

Brown Bears, Black Bears, Cinnamon Bears – We Have Them All

“A dreamer of pictures I run in the night You see us together, chasing the moonlight, My cinnamon bear.” Adapted from “Cinnamon Girl” by Neil Young When Colorado became a territory in 1861, it was still very much open space and wilderness.  Even when it was accepted into the Union as the 38th state in 1876,…

Libraries are Not Immune to Scandal

It has become a “thing” that people of power want to leave a legacy to the world by having a library named after them. Carnegie did it in a big way in the late 19th century.  US Presidents have been doing it officially since the creation of the Presidential Libraries Act of 1955 – but…

Mesa Verde Unveiled to the World

It is odd to credit an individual with the discovery of an ancient city – when all he did was take the road less traveled when rounding up his cattle and BAM – there it was.  None the less, the discovery was made, the man became famous, research on the site began, the man was…

Rocky Mountain National Park – the Birth of a Colorado Treasure

The National Parks Service turned 100 years old this year – and we have a lot to thank that illustrious organization for.  They are the keepers of some of Colorado’s most treasured items – the National Parks within our state.  Join us as we read about the creation of the Rocky Mountain National Park, established…

You Find the Darndest Things in Early Newspapers

One of the curious parts of reading the modern paper and watching the news on the television is learning about what other people are up to – whether it be in your own back yard, or in a nearby state.  This is even odder when reading historic news.  People can’t help but get up to…

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